NPR

Fake snakes, mimicking moths and disguised flies: surviving in a bug eat bug world.
We took a field trip to the largest green roof in New York City. Then we imagined what the city could be like if all of its roof space was green. Note: A previous version of this video incorrectly thanked the Audubon Society. We meant to thank the NYC Audubon Society.
Here are a few things to know about American Sign Language from five people who use it every day. "One thing is, daily, we see that hearing people think that ASL isn't a language," D.T. Bruno said in an interview for this video," but the brain doesn't discriminate against ASL as a language.
Over the past year, NPR and ProPublica have been investigating why American mothers die in childbirth at a far higher rate than in any other developed country. In the course of our reporting, another disturbing statistic emerged: for every American woman who dies, 70 nearly die.
There's so much information -- and anxiety -- out there about how much time your kids should spend using devices. Here's our video guide to balancing the need for limits with the potential benefits. * Read "5 Things To Know About Screen Time Right Now" at http://n.pr/2CyGZzS * Take the quiz: "What Kind of Screen Time Parent Are You?"
On Jan. 20, 2017, Donald J. Trump became the 45th president of the United States. Between the inauguration ceremony and the Women's March on Washington, hundreds of thousands of people came to the nation's capital to be heard.
Tinier than a Tiny Desk Concert: Watch musicians Tom Brosseau and Sean Watkins, veterans of NPR Music's Tiny Desk Concert series, as they squeeze into a tiny house called The Matchbox in downtown Washington, D.C. and share some of their intimate tunes from their record North Dakota Impressions.
See more Field Recordings at: npr.org/series/144918893/field-recordings "On A Chilly Factory Floor, Yuja Wang's Piano Sizzles" Chinese-born pianist Yuja Wang isn't one to do anything in half measures. So when we invited her to record a performance in a room at the Steinway & Sons piano factory, she showed up in Queens that frigid morning with her A game.

National Geographic

For Xaviar Peterson, eating lunch at the school cafeteria, at a friend's house, or in a restaurant, can be extremely dangerous. There's a long list of foods-from peanuts, to shellfish, to sesame-that could quickly send him into life-threatening anaphylactic reaction. He's one of up to 15 million Americans who suffer from food allergies.
Every summer the young horses of Iceland roam the northern mountains freely. Many farmers believe this is what creates their strong personalities and sturdiness. In the autumn, farmers, neighbors, and family members follow the tradition of göngur, herding the horses home. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure.
The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull drew the world's attention to Iceland by disrupting air traffic for nearly a month. Today people from around the world are on waiting lists for tours to the country, ready to buy plane tickets the moment another eruption begins.

Anaquash: A Community’s Relationship to its River in Washington, D.C.

Shad Run

How a fish that fed our nation's founders was nearly lost from D.C.'s waters. What saved them? Learn more about the story and support the film here: https://igg.me/at/shadrunthefilm/x/501217

Corcoran College of Art + Design

Charlotte Dumas travels the world making evocative formal portraits of animals. She typically works in series, portraying animals characterized by their utility, social function, or by the way they relate to people. Anima, her first one-person museum exhibition in the United States, features a newly commissioned series of portraits centered on the majestic burial horses of Arlington National Cemetery. The exhibition also includes three earlier bodies of work that explore the inner lives of animals. Reverie (2005) depicts gray wolves, alone and in packs, in forested nature preserves in Sweden, Norway, and the United States. Palermo 7 (2006) is a series of close-up portraits showing racehorses, their heads tethered in place, in their hippodrome stalls in Italy and France. Heart Shaped Hole (2008) depicts stray dogs, adapting in different ways to the privation they experience on the streets of Palermo. Her work will be shown at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, July 14 - October 28, 2012. The video was produced by Corcoran College of Art and Design students: Paul Bothwell Clary Estes Becky Harlan
This video focuses on communication about the District of Colombia's renovation effort towards its public transportation system. Called Metro Forward it is a six year, five billion dollar project. All Copyrights for the video are held by BBLP productions 2012.